Quote: Man fully alive

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Man fully alive

“The glory of God is man fully alive.” – St. Irenaeus

What does this quote mean to you? Please share in the comments!

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Michael August 26, 2009 at 11:35 am

Man fully alive is when a man’s physical and spiritual life are both in union with God’s will and that will is being put into action through serving others as Christ has served us.

Manya August 26, 2009 at 12:37 pm

Man (encompassing men AND women), using the gifts God has given to him/her and LIVING life…not just biding time on this journey to heaven. Enjoying life to the fullest…helping others along the way…sharing faith…being people of integrity…being people of joy, even in the face of adversity! I

Brian June 3, 2012 at 11:18 am

Especially in the face of adversity.

Jason Gennaro August 26, 2009 at 1:41 pm

Jesus! He is the man who was and is fully alive and capable of making us fully alive (John 10:10). In transforming humanity and giving to it the possibility of fullness of life, He became/was revealed as the glory of God (John 17:4).

Steve Schreiner August 26, 2009 at 9:19 pm

It doesn’t really matter what I think it means…it matters what the Church thinks it means…which is:

294 The glory of God consists in the realization of this manifestation and communication of his goodness, for which the world was created. God made us “to be his sons through Jesus Christ, according to the purpose of his will, to the praise of his glorious grace”,[138] for “the glory of God is man fully alive; moreover man’s life is the vision of God: if God’s revelation through creation has already obtained life for all the beings that dwell on earth, how much more will the Word’s manifestation of the Father obtain life for those who see God.”[139] The ultimate purpose of creation is that God “who is the creator of all things may at last become “all in all”, thus simultaneously assuring his own glory and our beatitude.”[140]

Blaise Alleyne September 2, 2009 at 3:39 pm

Fully Alive is the textbook we used in elementary religion class in Ontario Catholic schools ;)

Craig September 11, 2009 at 7:39 am

I also used a text called “Fully Alive and Fully Human” in a philosophy class I took in college. It really brought the importance (not over-importance however) of our humanity to my mind. It is not just that we live for God alone and blindly reject our humanity. No. This flies in the very face of the Incarnation. But this is yet another lie the Evil One will have us believe if we are not prayerful people. Pray unceasingly my brothers and sisters. Jesus is both God and human. What a God!

Locksley Robinson September 13, 2009 at 9:59 am

For me this quotation reflects the image of Jesus, a man who was fully alive. He was physically fit, mentally alert and full of the Holy Spirit. That is what our Lord hopes for us to become, to be fully alive in Christ. We therefore achieve full balance in our spirit, mind and body and reflect the glory of God.

Nancy November 10, 2009 at 5:33 pm

God’s Glory….His Brillance, His love, His ever-lasting unconditional Love…Man fully alive…when God created us, He created us by reflecting his image and likeness into us. When we are fully WHO WE ARE, with all our faults, our dreams, desires, hopes, challenges, and all obstacles, when we can confront all the negative things, and believe only in the positive outcome…when we can smile after a long day and thank God, for everything…we are fully alive, and Gods glory has been redeemed…

Tony July 18, 2011 at 9:02 am

I’ve heard it said, God is glorified in us when we are satisfied in Him. Though this statement is not directly found in scripture, (nor the quote that we are all responding to) it does resonate within me. I believe that we are fully alive when we step into the thing that we have been created to do. Our desires, gifts, personalities and dreams, if we get honest with ourselves, all point us to the calling and purposes of God that was planned for us before we were even born according to Ephesians 2:10. “For we are God’s workmanship created in Christ Jesus to do good works, which God prepared in advance for us to do.” There is nothing better than waking up in the morning with the sense that we were created for God’s glory.

Tshepo August 10, 2011 at 6:18 am

“The glory of God is man fully alive.”
There’s wisdom behind this statement. It is when I am authentically and fully me that God manifests Godself to me. That’s why God chose to manifest Godself to us in the person of Jesus Christ. Jesus Christ was ‘truly human’ (and truly God, ofcourse) and it is in His full humanity that we see the glory of God. So I urge you all to be the best and fullest YOU that you can be. That’s our truest calling or vocation in life.

Bill Winn September 15, 2011 at 10:07 am

The glory of God is man fully alive means that the Father, SOn, and Spirit created the human race to share in their shared life and love. (adoption accomplished already in Jesus) To glorify God is to live loved in the Father’s embrace fully enjoying all of the gifts He has given us. To enjoy bbq’s, fine Scotch, love-making, laughter, food, friendship, football, fishing, singing, working, living, loving, and dreaming -just to name a few! To glorify God is to enjoy all of these things as He intended and to do so without religion but in the freedom Jesus has shared with us.

Faith October 6, 2012 at 1:36 pm

What this quote means to me. Those who have been loved will know what it is like to be fully alive. This quote below explains the difference of being born and fully alive.

“The Notion of the “Good”: If only God is “good,” then we can experience and know the “good” only in the experience of ourselves in the act of imaging God as being related to (the Logos) and relating to others by making the gift of ourselves.”

Ratzinger: “The root of man’s joy is the harmony he enjoys with himself. He lives in this affirmation. And only one who can accept himself can also accept the thou, can accept the world. The reason why an individual cannot accept the thou, cannot come to terms with him, is that he does not like his own I and, for that reason, cannot accept a thou.”

“Something strange happens here. We have seen that the inability to accept one’s I leads to the inability to accept a thou. But how does one go about affirming, assenting to, one’s I? The answer may perhaps be unexpected: We cannot do so by our own efforts alone. Of ourselves, we cannot come to terms with ourselves. Our I becomes acceptable to us only if it has first become acceptable to another I. We can love ourselves only if we have first been loved by someone else. The life a mother gives to her child is not just physical life, she gives total life when she takes the child’s tears and turns them into smiles. It is only when life has been accepted and is perceived as accepted that it becomes acceptable. Man is that strange creature that needs not just physical birth but also appreciation if he is to subsist. This is the root of the phenomenon known as hospitalism. When the initial harmony of our existence has been rejected, when that psycho-physical oneness has been ruptured by which the ‘Yes, it is good that you are alive’ sinks, with life itself, deep into the core of the unconscious – then birth itself is interrupted; existence itself is not completely established…. (T)he charism of revolution has been for a long time not just remonstrance against reparable injustices but protestation against existence itself, which has not experienced its acceptance and hence does not know that it is acceptable. If an individual is to accept himself, someone must say to him: ‘It is good that you exist’ – must say it, not with words, but with that act of the entire being that we call love. For it is the way of love to will the other’s existence and, at the same time, to bring that existence forth again. The key to the I lies with the thou; the way to the thou leads through the I.”

Fr. Jack November 16, 2012 at 12:06 pm

The quote is more accurately rendered, “The glory of God is a living man; and the life of man consists in beholding God.” When read in context this qoute is talking about Jesus being the man who is God’s glory in the fullest and in beholding this man humanity comes fully alive.

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